Thursday, September 27, 2012

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Group Presentation

Each group MUST provide the class a one-page handout of your topic (submit that handout to me before presenting also and email as attachment).

PLEASE submit your reference list in Word file (by email) and in hard copy before you present. (I recommend you send a draft well before you present also). Your references should be on your PP, if you do a PP.

All groups must be prepared to go the first day, but email and claim first presenting slot if you want.

PRESENTATIONS MUST BE 16-20 MINS LONG (ONLY), AND YOU SHOULD BE FAMILIAR WITH THE TECHNOLOGY YOU USE BEFORE THE PRESENTATION.

Monday

(1) Single-sex education

(2) Corporal punishment

(3) Homeschooling

(4) Foreign Language

Midterm

Midterm; self-evaluation/course midterm feedback

***[Include by mid-term your four school choices for your virtual school assignment.]

Frame the discussion below between Cody (Social Context Reformer) and the Gates Foundation ("No Excuses" Reformers) within this: "Is Poverty Destiny?"

You need to submit TWO requirements for this midterm:

(1) DUE before class October 12, email me a list of 8-10 key talking points you plan to contribute to the class discussion in class that day. These talking points should grow from the discussion below and should pull together the entire first half of this semester (topic readings, supplemental reading [Kozol], tutoring, and class discussions).

(2) Also email before October 12 a self-evaluation (as attachment) of your learning and work throughout the semester so far. What have you learned? How have you been challenged? What have we not covered yet that you want us to cover? What has been the quality of your work and engagement in the course so far? Please assign yourself a letter grade for the course so far. Feel free to offer positive and critical feedback on the course and my teaching as well in order to insure the course fulfills your needs and expectations for the remainder of the semester.

Class discussion: Anthony Cody education reform debate with the Gates Foundation (GF):

Cody

(1) Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: How Do We Build the Teaching Profession?
(2) Responding to the Gates Foundation: How do we Consider Evidence of Learning in Teacher Evaluations?
(3) Dialogue with the Gates Foundation: Can Schools Defeat Poverty by Ignoring It?
(4) Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: What Is the Purpose of K-12 Education?
(5) The Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: What Happens When Profits Drive Reform?

GF

(1) The Gates Foundation Responds: How do we Build the Teaching Profession
(2) The Gates Foundation Writes: How Do We Consider Evidence of Student Learning in Teacher Evaluation?
(3) The Gates Foundation Responds: Poverty Does Matter--But It Is Not Destiny
(4) The Gates Foundation Writes: K-12 Education: An Opportunity Catalyst
(5) The Gates Foundation Responds: The Role of the Marketplace in Education

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Monday, September 17, 2012

Corridor of Shame and the deficit view of poverty

How does the documentary Corridor of Shame portray people and children in poverty?

Place the portrayal of poverty and people in poverty in the context of the following:

"Return of the Deficit," Curt Dudley-Marling

"The Myth of the Culture of Poverty," Paul Gorski

"No Excuses" and the Culture of Shame: Why Metrics Don't Matter

Friday, September 14, 2012

Change of Subject: Why teachers have test anxiety, too

Change of Subject: Why teachers have test anxiety, too

Lean Production: What’s Really Hurting Public Education | Jacobin

Lean Production: What’s Really Hurting Public Education | Jacobin

Daily Kos: Why you should care about what happens to the poor

Daily Kos: Why you should care about what happens to the poor

Daily Kos: On "Hostile Rhetoric," Laziness, and the Education Debate

Daily Kos: On "Hostile Rhetoric," Laziness, and the Education Debate

Midterm: Anthony Cody/ Gates Foundation Reform Dialogue

Midterm; self-evaluation/course midterm feedback

Class discussion: Anthony Cody education reform debate with the Gates Foundation (GF):

Cody

(1) Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: How Do We Build the Teaching Profession?
(2) Responding to the Gates Foundation: How do we Consider Evidence of Learning in Teacher Evaluations?
(3) Dialogue with the Gates Foundation: Can Schools Defeat Poverty by Ignoring It?
(4) Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: What Is the Purpose of K-12 Education?
(5) The Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: What Happens When Profits Drive Reform?

GF

(1) The Gates Foundation Responds: How do we Build the Teaching Profession
(2) The Gates Foundation Writes: How Do We Consider Evidence of Student Learning in Teacher Evaluation?
(3) The Gates Foundation Responds: Poverty Does Matter--But It Is Not Destiny
(4) The Gates Foundation Writes: K-12 Education: An Opportunity Catalyst
(5) The Gates Foundation Responds: The Role of the Marketplace in Education

The Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice

The Great Lakes Center for Education Research and Practice

Friday, September 7, 2012

Why All Ed Reform Fails | Alternet

Why All Ed Reform Fails | Alternet

Outing ACT: Test-and-Punish Doesn't Educate, but It's Profitable for Testing Companies

Outing ACT: Test-and-Punish Doesn't Educate, but It's Profitable for Testing Companies

Kliebard, Herbert M. (2004). The Struggle for the American Curriculum, 1893–1958 (3rd ed.). New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

Kliebard, Herbert M. (2004). The Struggle for the American Curriculum, 1893–1958 (3rd ed.). New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

Education Review-a journal of book reviews
Kliebard devotes the bulk of his book to describing four relatively stable and distinct “interest groups” that competed over seven decades for control of the schools through the curriculum. Humanists embraced “the systematic development of reasoning power” (p. 9) as well as the Western cultural heritage. Developmentalists “proceeded basically from the assumption that the natural order of development in the child was the most significant and scientifically defensible basis for determining what should be taught” (p. 11). Social efficiency educators wanted schools to employ the “scientific management” techniques of supervision, accountability, precise measurement, and efficiency and to differentiate education according to students’ perceived needs, abilities, and probable life courses. Social meliorists wanted to use schooling as a lever for societal progress.

Bias in the SAT?

Bias in the SAT?

New Evidence of Racial Bias on SAT | Inside Higher Ed

New Evidence of Racial Bias on SAT | Inside Higher Ed

Why Scotland's approach to publicly funded education works | Education | The Guardian

Why Scotland's approach to publicly funded education works | Education | The Guardian

Friday, August 24, 2012

Time as Capital: The Rise of the Frantic Class

Time as Capital: The Rise of the Frantic Class

Alfie Kohn on Twitter

Alfie Kohn ‏@alfiekohn

Philip Jackson: Kids sit around tables but usually must remain silent. Key lesson of US classrooms is “how to be alone in a crowd”

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

What happens if...?

What happens to this course if the grades for the class are restricted the following way?:

A = 2

B = 10

C = 3

Consider this in light of reading Foucault.

Everything You've Heard About Failing Schools Is Wrong | Mother Jones

Everything You've Heard About Failing Schools Is Wrong | Mother Jones

Monday, August 20, 2012

Education Reform (graphic journalism)

The Disaster Capitalism Curriculum: The High Price of Education Reform (Episode I)

Murky Waters: The Education Debate in New Orleans

The Finnish Alternative: Reclaiming Public Education From Corporate Reform

Education as “Politically Contested Spaces”

Education as “Politically Contested Spaces”

Six Degrees of Insanity: "Reforming" Education | Alternet

Six Degrees of Insanity: "Reforming" Education | Alternet

Alternative Assignment: Education Advocacy Assignment


Education Advocacy Assignment:

1)    Identify three education-related bills on the federal level about which you have some interest and/or concern.  Submit those three choices by the due date to the instructor.  The instructor will then assign you one of those three options on a first-come, first-serve basis.  No more than two students will be permitted to analyze the same bill.

2)    Next, answer the following questions about the bill (2-3 double-spaced pages minimum).  Make sure to attach a copy of the first page of the proposed bill to your paper. 

a)     Summary of the bill (a paragraph will suffice).
b)     What does this bill propose to do?
c)   Do you favor or oppose the bill?  Explain.
d)   What might be some of the opposing viewpoints (to your own) regarding the bill?
e)   Does this bill illustrate any awareness of community or cultural diversity?  Why or why not?

3)   Identify a United States senator or representative from South Carolina (or your home state) and prepare a letter telling him/her whether you think he/she should or should not support the bill.  Be clear and concise in your reasoning (1 single-spaced page maximum).  Attach a copy of your letter to your paper.

4)   Identify a newspaper in South Carolina (or your home state) and write a letter to the editor regarding your viewpoints about the bill. Give your letter a brief title.  Do no exceed 250 words.  Attach your letter to the editor to your paper.

It is your decision whether to actually submit your letter to a senator/representative and/or a newspaper editor.


Useful websites for this assignment:

Search Current Legislation
Use the subject/keyword “education” for best results:


How Can I Contact my Legislators?
Use your zip code to find your legislator.  Click on the names listed to read a bio and see contact information:


Sample Letters


Greenville News tips for writing a Letter to the Editor (can be applied generally to all newspapers)



Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Topic 7: Current Issues and the Future of Education


Topic 7: Current Issues and the Future of Education

Recommended by Larry Cuban



NCLB, RTTT, Opting Out of NCLB

Merit Pay

"The Folly of Merit Pay," Education Week, September 17, 2003, Alfie Kohn

"Against 'Competitiveness,'" Education Week, September 19, 2007, Alfie Kohn

Topic 6: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment


Topic 6: Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment

Curriculum







Instruction



Alfie Kohn:


"It's Not What We Teach; It's What They Learn," Education Week, September 10, 2008

"Unconditional Teaching," Educational Leadership, September 2005

"Getting-Hit-on-the-Head Lessons," Education Week, September 7, 2005

Assessment and grades

"The Case Against Grades," Educational Leadership, November 2011, Alfie Kohn

Alfie Kohn on Standards and Testing: http://www.alfiekohn.org/standards/testarticles.htm

"The Trouble with Rubrics," English Journal, March 2006, Alfie Kohn

Textbooks




Teaching content v. teaching students

Hidden curriculum

Technology in education

State and national assessment

Popham

Topic 5: Legal, Political, and Financial


Topic 5: Legal, Political, and Financial


Role Of Federal Government In Public Education: Historical Perspectives, Carolyn Jefferson-Jenkins and Margaret Hawkins Hill


Key Issue: Prayer in School (Religion and Education)



Key Issues: School Choice, Private Schools, Homeschooling, Charter Schools







Topic 4: Diversity, Multiculturalism, Poverty/Privilege, Class, and Race

Topic 4: Diversity, Multiculturalism, Poverty/Privilege, Class, and Race

Unlearning Deficit Ideology and the Scornful Gaze:Thoughts on Authenticating the Class Discourse in Education, Paul Gorski

Good Intentions Are Not Enough, Paul Gorski

Equality of Educational Opportunity: A 40-Year Retrospective





Key Issue: At-Risk Students



Key Issue: LGBT Students and Education








Topic 3: Historical Foundations of Education


Topic 3: Historical Foundations of Education




Key Issue: Corporal Punishment



Key Issue: Single-Sex Education








Key Issue: Parental Public School Choice

Topic 2: Educational Philosophies


Topic 2: Educational Philosophies








Topic 1: The Teaching Profession


Topic 1: The Teaching Profession

History of teacher education







Is teaching a profession?






Thursday, April 5, 2012

Education: What's Next?

• Charter school movement continues and vouchers return.


Matthew DiCarlo

P. L. Thomas

• Teacher quality under assault—VAM, Teacher for America, NCTQ.

• Accountability, standards, and testing remain, and increase—Common Core State Standards (CCSS).


• Race to the Top, Opting Out of NCLB.


• Increased acquisition of technology in education, as well as increased use of technology for test-prep and testing.


CAUTION!: Technology


Monday, March 12, 2012

Education Department Orientation: Wednesday, March 21, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

THINKING ABOUT TEACHING?
Education Department Orientation
Wednesday, March 21
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Hipp Hall 107

At this meeting, you will receive the needed information to be admitted into the program, learn more about the transition points as you progress through the program, and the teaching internship. Please plan to attend if you wish to explore certification options or intend to teach in any of the following areas:

* Elementary Education (Grades 2-6)
* Secondary fields (Grades 9-12):
Biology, Chemistry, English, Mathematics,
Physics, or Social Studies
* Languages (Grades PK-12): French, Latin, or Spanish
* Music Education (Grades PK-12)

For more information, please contact charmaine.moore@furman.edu

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Midterm

DUE before class Thursday (March 1).

Send by email as attachments (two separate attachments):

(1) Self-evaluation: Discuss in about 2 pp. (dbl-spaced, 12 pt font, 1"
margins) what you have learns so far this semester, how engaged you have been
in the course work (with specific examples), and what GRADE you believe you
deserve at midterm. Attach a file labeled with you three initials and
"selfeval": ex. ABC.selfeval.docx

(2) Class discussion: Email as an attachment a list of 6-10 topics to focus a midterm class
discussion focusing on the content addressed through midterm in EDU 111. This
should be a list with some detail about the topics--what you want to discuss,
etc. Attach a file labeled with you three initials and "midterm": ex.
ABC.midterm.docx